Technology-assisted review and cross-border discovery at Relativity Fest

relativity-logo-130There is, of course, much more happening at kCura’s Relativity Fest than technology-assisted review and cross-border discovery, the two things referred to in my heading. That’s just what I am participating in – there are more than 85 sessions in all covering a wide range of subjects including legal/business subjects such as law in practice, IG, risk, compliance and security, and technical things like administration and workflow, IT infrastructure, platform and Relativity Fundamentals.

The technology-assisted review panel which I am moderating in the Law in Practice track is called Technology-Assisted Review: Learn about Da Silva Moore, Quinn, and Pyrrho from participants in the cases. The “participants in the cases” referred to in the title are:

Andrew Peck – U.S. Magistrate Judge, Southern District of New York
Daniel Wyatt – Associate, Reynolds Porter Chamberlain
Edward Spencer – Associate, Taylor Wessing
Karyn Harty – Partner, McCann Fitzgerald

The cases in the session title are respectively the leading US, Irish and UK technology-assisted review cases. The idea for the panel came to me while listening to kCura CEO Andrew Sieja reviewing the year at the London Relativity Roadshow in April. Talking of analytics, he put the names of these three cases on the screen, and it occurred to me that it would be really interesting to gather the participants in each of them and hear what they had to say.

I have the best of all worlds here – I get to choose the speakers, and the extremely efficient Relativity Fest admin team deals with the organisation, the programme description, and all those other practical things. Although we will in fact do some preparation, a panel on this subject and with these participants could entertain and inform at five minutes’ notice if necessary – I am very lucky in my panels.

There is another TAR panel at Relativity Fest. Called Negotiating TAR protocols, its speakers include Jon Lavender of DTI, Philip Favro of Driven and Dean Gonsowski of kCura.

My other formal involvement at Relativity Fest is in a session called Brexit and beyond: international issues and cross-border eDiscovery. I cannot improve on the formal panel description which reads as follows:

Join a panel of US and international legal experts for an analysis of legal developments affecting international data transfers and cross-border e-discovery. In addition to Brexit’s effect on data law issues between the US, the UK, and the EU, topics will include global data privacy and cyber protection developments, the EU-US Privacy Shield, the EU General Protection Regulation, and US domestic laws, including the Dublin warrant dispute in Microsoft v. United States.

As well as me, the panel consists of:

Patrick Burke – Senior Counsel, Seyfarth Shaw
Edward McAndrew – Partner, Ballard Spahr
Meribeth Banaschik – Senior Associate, Noerr-Dusseldorf
David Horrigan – eDiscovery Counsel and Legal Content Director, kCura

I have done panels with all of them, in the case of Patrick Burke since around the dawn of eDiscovery time – we have been doing cross-border panels together since forever.

As always, Relativity Fest has a purpose which goes beyond the panels. I did some video interviews last year and the recurring theme from the people I spoke to was the opportunity to speak to others facing the same challenges. Relativity is designed to be user-configurable to a great extent, and the opportunity to share experiences and to understand what others are doing is unbeatable.

I will be accompanied by my son William so that we can again do some video interviews. Last year we used the Normandie Lounge at the Chicago Hilton as our studio. I have written about that room here.

Normandie

 

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About Chris Dale

I have been an English solicitor since 1980. I run the e-Disclosure Information Project which collects and comments on information about electronic disclosure / eDiscovery and related subjects in the UK, the US, AsiaPac and elsewhere
This entry was posted in Discovery, eDisclosure, eDiscovery, Electronic disclosure, KCura, Predictive Coding, Relativity, Technology Assisted Review. Bookmark the permalink.

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