Interview: Chris Haley of Troutman Sanders talks about Relativity customisation

At Relativity Fest in Chicago last October, I spoke to Chris Haley, the Director of Legal Technology at Troutman Sanders. I asked him what led his firm to choose Relativity for eDiscovery.

Chris Haley said that when the firm reviewed the software market, they were looking for the ability to take control of the application and to use it to differentiate themselves so that clients would understand the benefits of using them.

Relativity, he said, offered a platform which the firm could build on and customise, if necessary on a matter by matter basis. The firm gained experience to write its own applications, and the relevant team members are taken to client meetings to help them understand what is needed for that client and that matter.

The firm has a number of such customisations. Most recent is one called Converge which is designed to deal with multiple cases which are related in some way – perhaps with overlapping custodians. Clients often like to use different merits counsel but do not want to pay multiple times for storage and processing. Converge allows a separate workspace for each matter with links back to documents in a single repository.

Like most of the people I spoke to at Relativity Fest, Chris Haley was excited about Relativity’s developments in Active Learning. He also mentioned specifically the new email threading visualisation tools which, he says, is used even by the “higher level partners, the big thinkers” who are normally tech averse. This is turning up as a recurring theme in some of my discussions about data visualisation – that it is winning attention from senior people who have hitherto been unwilling to use technology themselves.

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About Chris Dale

I have been an English solicitor since 1980. I run the e-Disclosure Information Project which collects and comments on information about electronic disclosure / eDiscovery and related subjects in the UK, the US, AsiaPac and elsewhere
This entry was posted in Discovery, eDiscovery, Relativity. Bookmark the permalink.

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