Interview: Nick Robertson of Relativity gives a summary of Relativity Fest 2017

With Relativity Fest London nearly upon us (it is on 1 May) it is timely to publish an interview which I did with Nick Robertson, Chief Operating Officer at Relativity at the end of last October’s Relativity Fest in Chicago in which he summarised the main points which interested people at that event.

The first is the continuing extension of functionality in Relativity – the core functionality used by most people day in and day out. He specifically identified sub-second review speeds and what Relativity calls Document Intelligence which (among other things) seeks out and flags hidden content like spreadsheet formulae and speaker notes which might be of particular interest.

Next, Nick Robertson had seen very great interest in Relativity’s new active learning workflow. The use of analytics by Relativity users had doubled in the last year, he said, with ever-growing interest in an active learning workflow which he described as a “suggestion engine for lawyers”.

The feedback he was getting was excitement at the fact that virtually no training or explanation is needed to get started with the new analytics tools. The lawyers find a few documents that are relevant and off they go.

Nick Robertson’s third point was the increased take-up of RelativityOne, Relativity’s cloud-based solution. Among the many benefits is that hours which used to be spent just to keep Relativity running can now be used to deliver high-value solutions to interesting problems. There has been considerable expansion of RelativityOne take-up since last October when this interview was recorded – there are now 22 RelativityOne customers, 164 TB of RelativityOne data, and 256M RelativityOne documents; RelativityOne is now available in the US, UK, and Hong Kong.

All these subjects will get a fresh airing at Relativity Fest London on 1 May. I wrote about that here.

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About Chris Dale

I have been an English solicitor since 1980. I run the e-Disclosure Information Project which collects and comments on information about electronic disclosure / eDiscovery and related subjects in the UK, the US, AsiaPac and elsewhere
This entry was posted in Analytics, Discovery, eDisclosure, eDiscovery, Electronic disclosure, Relativity and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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